Ask a Trooper: Drivers License from Another State

By KBJR News 1

Ask a Trooper: Drivers License from Another State

April 29, 2013 Updated Apr 29, 2013 at 10:49 AM CST

In this week's Ask a Trooper article, Sgt. Curtis Mowers of the Minnesota State Patrol answers the question about whether people moving to Minnesota have to take a road test when they get a new drivers license.

Question: This is a follow-up question to your recent article about people from other states moving to Minnesota, and having 60 days to get their Minnesota driver license. Does someone from another state moving here need to take a road test or just a written test or what? I have relatives moving here soon and they have a valid license from another state and want to know what they need to do, or what they can expect. Thanks for a quick reply.

Answer: I spoke with a friend about this who is a driver’s license examiner. He told me that someone moving here that has a valid license from another state only has to take a written test. Also, they are going to require another form of primary identification in addition to a driver’s license (e.g., a passport or certified birth certificate). Depending on the situation, there may be other documentation required too, but it does not seem to apply to your situation.

Sometime during the application process, the current status of the driver’s license is checked in all states. If the person moving here from another state has any other state driver’s license issues, like revocation, then Minnesota will require that to be taken care of first before allowing the application for a Minnesota driver’s license to go through. If their license from the other state is expired for more than one year, then a road test will be required in addition to the written test. You can get a lot more details by visiting the Minnesota Dept. of Public Safety website and looking at the online driver’s manual.

Thanks for asking, and I hope your relatives get through the process quickly and easily. Just a reminder that Minnesota law requires a driver’s license to be in the driver’s possession, and officers do ask for it on traffic stops.