Wisconsin Schools Working to Implement No Child Left Behind Waiver Changes

By KBJR News 1

July 17, 2012 Updated Jul 17, 2012 at 8:35 PM CST

SUPERIOR, WI (Northland's NewsCenter) - Wisconsin schools are now working to implement a new system of assessing a school's effectiveness after Wisconsin was granted a flexibility waiver from No Child Left Behind.

While many districts are happy to see changes away from No Child Left Behind, some school leaders say it's a struggle to make the changes so quickly.

School leaders say there is some frustration because big changes are happening very fast.

The new system of accountability will use multiple measures to rate schools as opposed to simply using test scores.

Report cards would consider student achievement, student growth, closing gaps, and on-track and postsecondary readiness to rate schools.

The Superior Federation of Teachers president says the union has been working to make sure support systems are in place to help teachers.

Successful teachers will be working as role models and mentors for other teachers to promote improvement.

While working with several components can be challenging, the union president believes it will be better than No Child Left Behind.

"I think it's a much stronger measure. It's going to be a lot better for us to take a look at what the students are doing, and we're going to be able to identify our areas of success, which is really what we need to do in order to make everybody successful," said Kim Kohlhaas, the President of the Superior Federation of Teachers.

School report cards will be released annually in the Fall.

The first student level data under the new system will be reported in the Spring of 2013, based on testing happening in November.

Wisconsin has had a number one rating in graduation rates under No Child Left Behind, but the State Superintendent says part of what keeps the schools strong is the ability to respond to the needs of a changing world.

Posted to Web by Jena Pike
jpike@northlandsnewscenter.com

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