Authorities Continue to Investigate Possible Police Impersonators

By KBJR News 1

January 7, 2013 Updated Jan 8, 2013 at 11:02 AM CST

Biwabik Township, MN (NNCNOW.com) - Authorities on the Iron Range continue to investigate a case of possible police impersonators.

They say that two men in an unmarked car reportedly used dash–mounted police emergency lights to pull over a woman in Biwabik Township Saturday evening.

"None of our vehicles just operate off dash lights like this vehicle did," said Lt. Ed Kippley of the St. Louis County Sheriff's Office.

According to the St. Louis County Sherriff's office in Virginia, a dark, unmarked car with dash–mounted police emergency lights pulled over the woman after dark on County Highway 4. When two men in jeans got out of the vehicle, she became suspicious and called authorities.

"Normally, when people get out of the car like that, if there is two people in the car, both of them don't approach the car, one will stay with the squad," said Kippley.

Kippley says cases of police impersonation are rare, but scary nonetheless.

"I have a wife and I would certainly be concerned for her, you know, if she's out on roads at night and something like this happened," said Martin Beck, who lives on County Highway 4

Authorities say if you're suspicious of the person attempting to pull you over, don't unlock your door or roll down your window before asking to see an ID. A legitimate member of law enforcement will have a photo ID proving who they are.

"Most law enforcement officers will have some type of badge on them, identifying the department they're in, and a handgun that's on their side," said Kippley.

Additionally, if you're driving in a remote area and don't feel safe pulling over, authorities say you can keep driving until you reach a well–lit and populated area. An real law enforcement officer would follow you there.

The Sherriff's office says that most traffic stops are made by marked squad cars. However, in some cases they do have plain clothes officers make stops.

Written for the web by Jennifer Austin.

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