Duluth, MN Green–thumbs across the Northland, get your trowels ready. It was a slow start to the growing season, but its finally here. Folks may be eager to get lawns and gardens ready, but you may still want to let the soil dry a bit first. Karen Anderson, the Director of Community Relations at WLSSD said, "With the slow start to spring folks need to let their soil dry out a little bit before they start messing with it. So it's a good time to tidy up the yard, rake up those leaves, even with the grass raking you want to be a little careful with that." And what do you do with your lawn scraps? Well don't throw them away! "In the state of Minnesota you are not allowed to throw your yard waste in the trash, it's a great resource." said Anderson. Composting that lawn litter is the best thing to do. But did you know that you can also bring invasives like Buckthorn to a compost site? Anderson said, "Folks do often call us and ask if we do take buckthorn and we do take that material here. Again, we have that professionally ground and it does go into the composting mix." It ends up being a perfect circle, you take your local yard waste out of your yard, and replace it with locally made compost from somebody else yard. "It's a locally made product and everybody participates in that process. When you bring your grass clippings and your brush in here, when you use a drop site for your food waste, you eat at a restaurant in town that sends us their food waste, all of that goes into make this product right here in Duluth Minnesota" said Anderson. WLSSD would also like to remind people that excess sand and salt from this winter should not be added to compost and should be either reused or disposed of properly. Meteorologist Adam Lorch