Red clay in Lake Superior may result in loss of aquatic habitiat, officials say

By KBJR News 1

Red clay in Lake Superior may result in loss of aquatic habitiat, officials say

June 27, 2012 Updated Jun 27, 2012 at 4:17 PM CDT

(Northland's NewsCenter) -- After torrential rain hit the northeast Minnesota region, a cloud of red clay is still visible in the Chequamegon Bay of Lake Superior.

The Chequamegon Bay Area Partnership (CBAP) and an array of agencies, nonprofit groups and educational institutions have identified sediment as one of the key water quality issues facing the region.

"Excessive sedimentation results in the loss of aquatic habitat. It can impede navigation and access," said Tom Fratt, CBAP partner and conservationist for the Ashland County Land and Water Conservation Department.

Fratt also said that because Chequamegon Bay is the source of drinking water for the City of Ashland, the treatment through additional filtering and disinfection will increase the cost of water treatment.

CBAP has implemented several projects to address sedimentation issues in the region.

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